Jason Weathersby

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BIRT supplies scripting hooks for just about every report element in the palette. You can generally implement an onPrepare, onCreate, and onRender event handler for each of these report items. The onPrepare event fires before data is retrieved and allows you to change the design for a specific report item. The onCreate event fires when the report item is being created by the report engine’s generation task. The onRender event fires when the report item is being rendered by the report engine’s render task. These events and example are described on the BIRT website. Some report items offer more event hooks. For example a chart item actually has over thirty event hooks that allow total customization of the chart generation and presentation phases. As a side note, all chart scripts fire during the report engine’s render task. This does not mean the database is hit at re... (more)

Developing an Application Using the Eclipse BIRT Report Engine API

The Eclipse platform is an open source, integrated system of application development tools that you implement and extend using a plug-in interface. The Eclipse Business Intelligence Reporting Tool (BIRT) is a set of plug-in extensions that enable a developer to add reporting functionality to an application. BIRT provides a Report Engine API that a developer can use to create a customized report generator application. The org.eclipse.birt.report.engine.api package contains a set of interfaces and implementation classes that supports integrating the runtime part of BIRT into an a... (more)

Accessing Spring Beans from the BIRT Designer

Java Developer Magazine on Ulitzer Recently I have described methods that can be used to access Spring Beans from the BIRT Engine. These examples are intended to be illustrative and not comprehensive. More on BIRT and Spring Calling Spring Objects from BIRT Expressions and Event Handlers In both of these examples I used the BIRT engine to retrieve Spring objects within the scripting environment. In this post I am supplying an example that illustrates how to implement your own menu in the expression builder, so Spring objects can be called within the BIRT Designer. This will allow... (more)

Conditional Table Filters

Just ran across this and it is a nice technique for those situations where you are limited to table based filtering of data. Typically, I focus on data filtering as far up stream as possible. It is better to filter data at the source (in the where clause for JDBC). Next, I use DataSet based filtering. But sometimes you can't filter at the Source or the DataSet, which is where table based filtering comes in. The issue with table based filters is that there is no good way in the UI to implement conditional filtering. For instance, imagine you have a data driven parameter multi-select... (more)

What's the Difference Between dataSetRow["FIELD"] and row["FIELD"]

One of the most common questions for people that are new to BIRT is about how to ask data from the DataSet in the report.  The question is when building expressions should I use dataSetRow["FIELD"] or row["FIELD"]? So let me see if I can set the record straight.  When data is acquired, it is acquired by a DataSet, so the following query in a JDBC DataSet will create a three field resultset: select CITY, STATE, COUNTRY from CUSTOMERS Any script or expressions written on the DataSet will be written to use the format row["FIELD_NAME"]; So if we add a computed column to the DataSet c... (more)